Thursday, May 5, 2016

Cheaper Solar Adds to Coal's End Game


Al Gore's profile photo
    Special thanks to Al Gore for sharing this with us on our Google Plus stream.

 

New Record Set for World's Cheapest Solar, Now Undercutting Coal 




  • 2.99 U.S. cents per kilowatt-hour is 15% lower than old record
  • Cheaper than new coal-fired electricity in the Gulf emirate
Solar power set another record-low price as renewable energy developers working in the United Arab Emirates shrugged off financial turmoil in the industry to promise projects costs that undercut even coal-fired generators.
Developers bid as little as 2.99 cents a kilowatt-hour to develop 800 megawatts of solar-power projects for the Dubai Electricity & Water Authority, the utility for the Persian Gulf emirate, announced on Sunday. That’s 15 percent lower than the previous record set in Mexico last month, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance.

Support for the TTIP has fallen sharply in Germany and the US 

Many Germans fear the deal will lower standards for products, consumer protection and the labor market. 



RSPO Orders Palm Oil Company To Stop Work In Shipibo Territory In The Peruvian Amazon

The order was issued after the community filed a formal complaint for the destruction of over 5000 hectares of their ancestral forest lands. It cites the devastating impacts on the rivers and forest ecology on which their subsistence livelihood depends, the destruction of community dwellings and the restrictions on community members who wish to access the forest.



We Already Know 2016 Will Be the Warmest Year on Record—and It’s Only April 

March was the 11th consecutive month of a new record warm global monthly temperature, the longest streak since 1880

Stanley Druckenmiller thinks the world is heading for a debt-fueled disaster


Stan Druckenmiller  


Stanley Druckenmiller, head of Duquesne Capital, thinks that the macroeconomy is looking disastrous and there are two sources for the coming problems.
Druckenmiller thinks that leverage is far too high, saying that central banks and China have allowed for these excesses to continue and it's setting us up for danger.
The obsession with short-term gains is overwhelming the need for long-term reform at the Federal Reserve, he said.
"It's this kind of myopia that causes reckless behavior at the government and corporate level," said Druckenmiller.
He highlighted that net cash flow has gone negative while net debt is still climbing at an unprecedented rate. He also said that instead of investing in growth, companies are adding the debt for financial engineering like buybacks and M&A.
The corporate sector is stuck in a "vicious cycle" of chasing earnings and adding debt, he said.

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